What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And 2 Diabetes
The main difference between the type 1 and type 2 diabetes is that type 1 diabetes is a genetic condition that often shows up early in life, and type 2 is mainly lifestyle-related and develops over time. With type 1 diabetes, your immune system is attacking and destroying the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas.

Although type 1 and type 2 diabetes both have things in common, there are lots of differences. Like what causes them, who they affect, and how you should manage them. For a start, type 1 affects 8% of everyone with diabetes. While type 2 diabetes affects about 90%. Some people get confused between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

This can mean you have to explain that what works for one type doesn’t work for the other, and that there are different causes. The main thing to remember is that both are as serious as each other. Having high blood glucose (or sugar) levels can lead to serious health complications, no matter whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Can a type 2 diabetic become a type 1?

Type 2 diabetes can’t turn into type 1 diabetes. They’re separate conditions with distinct causes. Type 1 diabetes tends to develop in early childhood while type 2 diabetes can take years to develop. However, some people may be misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes when they have another condition. Keep reading to learn more about type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and other diagnoses.

Can type 2 diabetes go away?

Overview – Type 2 diabetes is an impairment in the way the body regulates and uses sugar (glucose) as a fuel. This long-term (chronic) condition results in too much sugar circulating in the bloodstream. Eventually, high blood sugar levels can lead to disorders of the circulatory, nervous and immune systems.

In type 2 diabetes, there are primarily two interrelated problems at work. Your pancreas does not produce enough insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — and cells respond poorly to insulin and take in less sugar. Type 2 diabetes used to be known as adult-onset diabetes, but both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can begin during childhood and adulthood.

Type 2 is more common in older adults, but the increase in the number of children with obesity has led to more cases of type 2 diabetes in younger people. There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but losing weight, eating well and exercising can help you manage the disease.

Do type 2 diabetics need insulin?

Goals of insulin therapy – If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin therapy is vital for replacing the insulin your body doesn’t produce. Sometimes, people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes need insulin therapy if other treatments haven’t been able to keep blood glucose levels within the desired range.

What triggers type 1 diabetes?

What Causes Type 1 Diabetes? – Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). This reaction destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin, called beta cells. This process can go on for months or years before any symptoms appear.

  • Some people have certain genes (traits passed on from parent to child) that make them more likely to develop type 1 diabetes.
  • However, many of them won’t go on to have type 1 diabetes even if they have the genes.
  • A trigger in the environment, such as a virus, may also play a part in developing type 1 diabetes.

Diet and lifestyle habits don’t cause type 1 diabetes.

Can you stop taking insulin once you start?

If I have type 2 diabetes and take insulin, do I have to take it forever? Not necessarily. If you can lose weight, change your diet, increase your activity level, or change your medications you may be able to reduce or stop insulin therapy.

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What happens if you don’t treat diabetes type 2?

Complications of type 2 diabetes If diabetes isn’t treated, it can lead to a number of other health problems. High glucose levels can damage blood vessels, nerves and organs. Even a mildly raised glucose level that doesn’t cause any symptoms can have long-term damaging effects.

Is it better to take insulin or pills?

Can diabetes pills help me? – Only people with type 2 diabetes can use pills to manage their diabetes, people with type 1 diabetes must use insulin. These pills work best when used with meal planning and exercise. This way you have three therapies working together to lower your blood glucose levels.

What’s worse diabetes 1 or diabetes 2?

Which type of diabetes is the worst? – Type 1 diabetes is considered worse than type 2 because it is an autoimmune disease, so there isn’t a cure. Also, in a 2010 report⁴ from the UK, it’s estimated that the life expectancy of people with type 2 diabetes can be reduced by up to 10 years, while type 1 can reduce life expectancy by 20 years or more.

Can you suddenly become type 1 diabetes?

Can symptoms appear suddenly? – In people with type 1 diabetes, the onset of symptoms can be very sudden, while in type 2 diabetes, they tend to come about more gradually, and sometimes there are no signs at all. Symptoms sometimes occur after a viral illness.

  • In some cases, a person may reach the point of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) before a type 1 diagnosis is made.
  • DKA occurs when blood glucose (blood sugar) is dangerously high and the body can’t get nutrients into the cells because of the absence of insulin.
  • The body then breaks down muscle and fat for energy, causing an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine.

Symptoms of DKA include a fruity odor on the breath, heavy, taxed breathing and vomiting. If left untreated, DKA can result in stupor, unconsciousness, and even death. People who have symptoms—of type 1 or of DKA—should contact their health care provider immediately for an accurate diagnosis.

  • Eep in mind that these symptoms could signal other problems, too.
  • Some people with type 1 have a “honeymoon” period, a brief remission of symptoms while the pancreas is still secreting some insulin.
  • The honeymoon phase usually occurs after someone has started taking insulin.
  • A honeymoon can last as little as a week or even up to a year.

But it’s important to know that the absence of symptoms doesn’t mean the diabetes is gone. The pancreas will eventually be unable to secrete insulin, and, if untreated, the symptoms will return.

Can stress bring on type 1 diabetes?

How stress can affect diabetes – If you’re feeling stressed, your body releases stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. This should give you an energy boost for a ‘fight or flight’ response. But the hormones actually make it harder for insulin to work properly, known as insulin resistance,

  • As energy can’t get into your cells, your blood sugar levels rise.
  • If your blood sugar levels go too high, it’s called going hyper (full name hyperglycaemia).
  • We’ve got more information about hypers, how to avoid them and how they’re treated,
  • If stress doesn’t go away, it can keep your blood sugar levels high and put you at higher risk of diabetes complications,

It can also affect your mood and how you look after yourself, which can start to affect your emotional health. But there are things you can do to take the pressure off,

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Can someone with type 1 diabetes have a baby?

During Your Pregnancy – As soon as you find out that you’re pregnant, work with your medical team to manage your blood sugar and head off complications. During your pregnancy, you and your doctors will adjust your diabetes management plan, so it’s important that you trust your team and feel free to reach out to them.

An endocrinologist (a doctor who treats hormone conditions, including diabetes). You may want to find one who specializes in caring for pregnant women with diabetes. An obstetrician (a doctor who treats pregnant women). Your pregnancy may be considered high risk because of your diabetes. If that’s the case, you may want to find an obstetrician who takes care of women with high-risk pregnancies. A diabetes educator who can help you manage your diabetes during pregnancy.

Here are a few things to keep in mind: Keep your A1C levels on target. Blood sugar levels that stay high during pregnancy may cause your baby to grow too large (macrosomia) or harm the early development of organs and lead to birth defects. Know your risks.

Preecalampsia – high blood pressure that can damage the liver and kidneys. Insulin resistance – when insulin is less effective at lowering your blood sugar. Miscarriage. Macrosomia – a larger-than-average baby. This can lead to a more difficult delivery. Birth defects that may affect your baby’s heart, brain, spine, kidneys, digestive system, limbs, and mouth.

Read more about possible risks during pregnancy. Be aware of changing insulin needs. Your insulin needs may change throughout your pregnancy. Low blood sugar is common in women with type 1 diabetes. Check with your health care team about how much insulin you need and how often you need it.

If you are delivering in a hospital, what is the procedure for women who wear an insulin pump? Can you keep your CGM on during labor and delivery? Who will manage your blood sugar levels during and after labor and delivery? What diabetes supplies do you need to pack in your hospital bag?

Learn more about birth plans external icon for people with type 1 diabetes.

Can type 1 diabetics live to 80?

Boston-based George King, MD, the chief scientific officer with the Joslin Diabetes Center, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, estimates that since the introduction of insulin in the 1920s, about 50 to 100 people with type 1 diabetes have lived beyond age 80 with the disease.

Can you suddenly become type 1 diabetes?

Can symptoms appear suddenly? – In people with type 1 diabetes, the onset of symptoms can be very sudden, while in type 2 diabetes, they tend to come about more gradually, and sometimes there are no signs at all. Symptoms sometimes occur after a viral illness.

  • In some cases, a person may reach the point of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) before a type 1 diagnosis is made.
  • DKA occurs when blood glucose (blood sugar) is dangerously high and the body can’t get nutrients into the cells because of the absence of insulin.
  • The body then breaks down muscle and fat for energy, causing an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine.

Symptoms of DKA include a fruity odor on the breath, heavy, taxed breathing and vomiting. If left untreated, DKA can result in stupor, unconsciousness, and even death. People who have symptoms—of type 1 or of DKA—should contact their health care provider immediately for an accurate diagnosis.

Keep in mind that these symptoms could signal other problems, too. Some people with type 1 have a “honeymoon” period, a brief remission of symptoms while the pancreas is still secreting some insulin. The honeymoon phase usually occurs after someone has started taking insulin. A honeymoon can last as little as a week or even up to a year.

But it’s important to know that the absence of symptoms doesn’t mean the diabetes is gone. The pancreas will eventually be unable to secrete insulin, and, if untreated, the symptoms will return.

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Can type 2 diabetes become insulin dependent?

Why Insulin Can Become Necessary for a Person with Type 2 Diabetes | Diabète Québec Starting insulin treatment should not be seen as a setback. People with type 2 diabetes may require insulin when their meal plan, weight loss, exercise and antidiabetic drugs do not achieve targeted blood glucose (sugar) levels.

  • Diabetes is a progressive disease and the body may require insulin injections to compensate for declining insulin production by the pancreas.
  • That is why starting insulin treatment should never be seen as a failure.
  • Starting insulin treatment should never be seen as a failure.
  • Treatment with insulin may be added to an antidiabetic medication or completely replace it.

Regardless of the treatment, lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, stress management) are essential to managing diabetes. Many people are reluctant to inject insulin for various reasons:

Fear of pain or needles Guilt Impression that this is the “last resort” Fear of hypoglycemic attacks Fear of weight gain Memories of loved one who had to take insulin

If this is the case, do not hesitate to discuss your concerns with a health care professional. Some of your fears may be due to false beliefs. Learning more about today’s insulin treatment will probably allay your fears. For many people, insulin is an effective way to achieve good blood-sugar control, which can prevent or delay certain diabetes complications over the long term.

  1. Every person with diabetes being treated with insulin should be trained by a health care professional.
  2. This training should include the different injection steps, as well as the treatment and prevention of hypoglycemia, which can occur in anyone on insulin.
  3. Research and text: Cynthia Chaput, Dietitian Scientific review: Louise Tremblay, Nurse.M.

Ed. June 2014 – Revised May 2016 : Why Insulin Can Become Necessary for a Person with Type 2 Diabetes | Diabète Québec

Can diabetes type 1 be temporary?

– For now, the honeymoon period in type 1 diabetes is only temporary. In time, the remaining insulin-producing cells will die, and a person will need to depend on insulin treatments. As yet, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. However, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), ongoing studies are actively looking at ways to:

identify type 1 diabetes early and prevent it from startingpreserve the function of the pancreasimprove monitoring, transplantation, and other techniquesdelay the progression of the diseaseprevent or reverse complications

One option they are considering is how to preserve beta-cell function in the pancreas, for example, by restoring normal immune function. If scientists can do this, one day there might be a never-ending honeymoon period for people with type 1 diabetes.

Is there a Type 3 diabetes?

What is type 3 diabetes? – Type 3 diabetes is not a recognised medical condition. It is sometimes referred to when someone who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes goes on to develop Alzheimer’s. We’re currently funding a research project that looks into the link between Alzheimer’s and type 2 diabetes,

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