How Many People Have Diabetes In Canada?

How Many People Have Diabetes In Canada

Prevalence – 2022 Diabetes (type 1 + type 2 diagnosed + type 2 undiagnosed) Diabetes (type 1 + type 2 diagnosed + type 2 undiagnosed) and prediabetes combined
PE 25,000 / 15% 50,000 / 31%
NS 173,000 / 17% 335,000 / 33%
NB 152,000 / 19% 274,000 / 35%
Canada 5,719,000 / 14% 11,704,000 / 30%

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What percentage of the Canadian population has diabetes?

Canadians reporting diabetes diagnosis percent 2003-2021 Basic Account Get to know the platform Starter Account The ideal entry-level account for individual users $59 USD $39 USD / Month * in the first 12 months Professional Account Full access * Prices do not include sales tax. Learn more about how Statista can support your business. “,”pointFormat”:” • “,”footerFormat”:” “},”plotOptions”:,”shadow”:false,”stacking”:null,”dataLabels”:,”enabled”:true,”zIndex”:3,”rotation”:0}},”pie”:,”format”:” • %”}},”line”: %”,”useHTML”:false,”crop”:false}},”bar”: %”,”useHTML”:false}},”column”: %”,”useHTML”:false}},”area”: },”annotations”:,”labelunit”:”%”},”colors”:,”series”:}],”navigation”: },”exporting”: }> StatCan. (August 26, 2022). Percentage of Canadians who reported being diagnosed with diabetes from 2003 to 2021, In Statista, Retrieved January 18, 2023, from https://www.statista.com/statistics/434091/share-of-canadians-reporting-being-diagnosed-with-diabetes/ StatCan. “Percentage of Canadians who reported being diagnosed with diabetes from 2003 to 2021.” Chart. August 26, 2022. Statista. Accessed January 18, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/434091/share-of-canadians-reporting-being-diagnosed-with-diabetes/ StatCan. (2022). Percentage of Canadians who reported being diagnosed with diabetes from 2003 to 2021, Statista, Statista Inc. Accessed: January 18, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/434091/share-of-canadians-reporting-being-diagnosed-with-diabetes/ StatCan. “Percentage of Canadians Who Reported Being Diagnosed with Diabetes from 2003 to 2021.” Statista, Statista Inc., 26 Aug 2022, https://www.statista.com/statistics/434091/share-of-canadians-reporting-being-diagnosed-with-diabetes/ StatCan, Percentage of Canadians who reported being diagnosed with diabetes from 2003 to 2021 Statista, https://www.statista.com/statistics/434091/share-of-canadians-reporting-being-diagnosed-with-diabetes/ (last visited January 18, 2023) Percentage of Canadians who reported being diagnosed with diabetes from 2003 to 2021, StatCan, August 26, 2022., Available: https://www.statista.com/statistics/434091/share-of-canadians-reporting-being-diagnosed-with-diabetes/ : Canadians reporting diabetes diagnosis percent 2003-2021

How many Canadians have diabetes 2022?

About Diabetes Canada: Diabetes Canada is a national health charity representing more than 11.7 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes.

How many Canadian adults have diabetes?

Types of diabetes – Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease characterized by the inability of the pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone which regulates blood sugar. Daily insulin injections are required. It most often begins in childhood. Neither the cause nor the means to reduce the risk of acquiring it are known.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body does not effectively use the insulin that is produced. It is driven by a complex mix of risk factors, such as unhealthy eating, physical inactivity and tobacco use, and determinants of health related to income, education, and the social and physical environment.

Genetic predisposition and obesity are also important risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Daily insulin injections may be required. Gestational diabetes is first diagnosed during pregnancy. While often this condition goes away after delivery, there is a high risk that people with gestational diabetes and their babies may develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

Prediabetes refers to blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. The condition is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Over 3 million people living in Canada, or 8.9% of the population, have diagnosed diabetes and after adjusting for the aging population, the prevalence is increasing at an average rate of 3.3% per year.

Further, 6.1% of Canadian adults aged 20-79 have prediabetes, putting them at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Footnote 2 This upward trend is expected to continue in the coming decades with the aging of Canada’s population leading to increasing comorbidities and complications, and greater demand for resources from economic and health care systems.

  • Diabetes is a challenging health condition that disproportionately affects certain populations within Canada.
  • Evidence shows that First Nations and Métis people, and people of African, East Asian and South Asian ethnic backgrounds have higher rates of type 2 diabetes compared to the general population.

Inequities in the social determinants of health (e.g., income, education, housing), resulting from the impacts of systemic racism, intergenerational trauma and colonization, are associated with higher rates of type 2 and gestational diabetes in priority populations.

Footnote 3 Similarly, socioeconomic factors influence the ability for individuals with diabetes to effectively manage their condition, and thus their risk of diabetes-related complications. Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases among children and youth. Type 1 diabetes remains the main form of the disease in this population.

While type 2 diabetes has historically been viewed as an adult disease, it has been on the rise globally in children and youth for the last two decades due to the rise in childhood obesity. Footnote 4 Footnote 5 According to national data from 2017–2018, just over 25,000 (0.33%) children and youth were living with diagnosed diabetes (type 1 and type 2 diabetes combined) in Canada.

  • Each year, more than 3,000 individuals aged 1 to 19 years are newly diagnosed with diabetes.
  • Further, the incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is expected to rise (by 3-fold and by 4-fold, respectively) in youth in the coming decades.
  • Footnote 6 Footnote 7 It has been observed that in Indigenous youth, type 2 diabetes progresses very rapidly and is more likely to result in serious complications, such as chronic kidney disease, at an earlier age and that both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have psychosocial impacts on individuals.

One study noted that First Nations adolescents with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes experience stigma and shame, which are substantial barriers to effective self-management of diabetes and seeking support and care for their condition. Footnote 8 Many people living with diabetes experience stigma associated with their condition, which can lead to adverse mental and physical health outcomes.

  • Stigma often occurs when individuals are often blamed for their diagnosis of type 2 or gestational diabetes due to associations with certain biological or lifestyle factors, such as weight or eating patterns.
  • People living with type 1 diabetes experience stigma associated with the intensive management of their condition, including dietary management, and hypoglycemic events.
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In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, other people’s perceptions of diabetes can lead to experiences of guilt, shame, embarrassment or isolation. Footnote 9 Footnote 10 The Chief Public Health Officer of Canada’s 2019 Report on the State of Public Health prioritized understanding and acting on stigma across health systems, and recognized that systemic racism can have an impact on people affected by certain chronic diseases, such as diabetes.

  1. The Report noted that stigma in health systems can lead to non-disclosure of health conditions, delayed or decreased use of health services and poorer quality of health services received by those from stigmatized groups who do seek care.
  2. Footnote 11 Furthermore, some racialized groups, particularly Indigenous Peoples, may be further challenged by experiences of systemic racism and discrimination by some health care providers.

Such experiences can be a significant barrier to health care access and also compromise the quality of care individuals receive when seeking health services and supports. Diabetes exacts considerable physical, emotional and economic challenges to affected individuals and families.

  • Effective management of blood glucose levels can reduce the risk of diabetes complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, sight loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and lower limb amputation.
  • Footnote 12 In Canada, evidence shows that there is an increased risk of more severe illness or outcomes from COVID-19 for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Footnote 13 Diabetes is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations in Canadian adults, associated with 20 times the risk of being hospitalized with non-traumatic lower limb amputations. Diabetes retinopathy is a leading cause of sight loss and disability.

More than 60% of individuals with type 2 diabetes develop some form of retinopathy. Footnote 15 The social, political, health and environmental conditions that created differential risks for COVID-19 overlap with factors that drive inequities in chronic diseases, particularly for people living in Canada facing marginalization.

Public health measures related to COVID-19, such as physical distancing and self-isolation restrictions, have had unintended negative consequences, including delayed diagnosis and treatment of diabetes and other health conditions. The pandemic context has also exacerbated physical inactivity, sedentary behaviours and other risk factors associated with chronic diseases, including diabetes.

What is the most common diabetes in Canada?

Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 per cent of diabetes cases, and increasingly in children.

Why is diabetes on the rise in Canada?

About 85 to 95 per cent of all diabetes cases in high-income countries are type 2. The number of people with type 2 diabetes is increasing dramatically because of Canada’s aging population, rising obesity rates, increasingly sedentary lifestyles, and higher risk for diabetes for Aboriginal people and new Canadians.

Is diabetes high in Canada?

Impact of Diabetes –

  • Among Canadians (1):
    • 30% live with diabetes or prediabetes;
    • 10% live with diagnosed diabetes, a figure that climbs to 14% when cases of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes are included.
  • Diabetes complications are associated with premature death (3). Diabetes can reduce lifespan by five to 15 years (3). It is estimated that the all-cause mortality rate among Canadians living with diabetes is twice as high as the all-cause mortality rate for those without diabetes (4).
  • People with diabetes are over three times more likely to be hospitalized with cardiovascular disease, 12 times more likely to be hospitalized with end-stage renal disease, and almost 20 times more likely to be hospitalized for a non-traumatic lower limb amputation compared to the general population (3).
  • The prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among people living with diabetes is approximately 30% (6). Individuals with depression have a 40% – 60% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (6).
  • Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss in people of working age (7). Vision loss is associated with increased falls, hip fractures, and a 4-fold increase in mortality (7). The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy is approximately 25% in Canada (8).
  • Foot ulceration affects an estimated 15%–25% of people with diabetes in their lifetime (9). One-third of amputations in 2011–2012 were performed on people reporting a diabetic foot wound (10).
  • The risk factors for type 1 diabetes are not well understood, but interaction between genetic and environmental factors are likely involved (11). Type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of individual, social, environmental, and genetic factors (11).
    • Certain populations are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, such as those of African, Arab, Asian, Hispanic, Indigenous, or South Asian descent, those who are older, have a lower level of income or education, are physically inactive, or are living with overweight or obesity (11).
    • The age-standardized prevalence rates for diabetes are 14.4% among people of South Asian descent, 12.9% among people of African descent, 9.4% among people of Arab/West Asian descent, 8.2% among people of East/Southeast Asian descent, and 4.5% among people of Latin American descent (12).
    • The prevalence of diabetes among South Asian and Black adults is 8.1 times and 6.6 times higher, respectively, then the prevalence among White adults (12).
    • The age-standardized prevalence rates for diabetes are 17.2% among First Nations individuals living on-reserve, 10.3% among First Nations individuals living off-reserve, and 7.3% among Métis people, compared to 5.0% in the general population (13). Further, the prevalence of diabetes among First Nations adults living off reserve and Métis adults is, respectively, 5.9 times and 3.1 times that of non-Indigenous adults (12). In addition to the risk factors that impact all people in Canada, the ongoing burden of colonization continues to influence Indigenous Peoples’ health.
    • The prevalence of diabetes among adults in the lowest income groups is 4.9 times that of adults in the highest income group (12).
    • Adults who have not completed high school have a diabetes prevalence 5.2 times that of adults with a university education (12).
    • Adults who are permanently unable to work have a diabetes prevalence 2.9 times that of employed adults (14).
  • For many Canadians with diabetes, adherence to treatment is affected by cost. The majority of Canadians with diabetes pay more than 3% of their income or over $1,500 per year for prescribed medications, devices, and supplies out-of-pocket (2,15).
  • Among Canadians with type 2 diabetes, 33% do not feel comfortable disclosing their disease to others (2).
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may affect mood and behaviour, and can lead to emergency situations if left untreated (11).
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Is diabetes a leading cause of death in Canada?

Diabetes death rate Canada 2000-2020 | Statista Basic Account Get to know the platform Starter Account The ideal entry-level account for individual users $59 USD $39 USD / Month * in the first 12 months Professional Account Full access * Prices do not include sales tax.

Overview Provinces Disease deaths Cancer deaths Other causes Focus: Opioid deaths Further related statistics Learn more about how Statista can support your business. StatCan. (January 24, 2022). Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population), In Statista, Retrieved January 18, 2023, from https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan.

“Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population).” Chart. January 24, 2022. Statista. Accessed January 18, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan. (2022). Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population),

Statista, Statista Inc. Accessed: January 18, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan. “Death Rate for Diabetes Mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 Population).” Statista, Statista Inc., 24 Jan 2022, https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan, Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population) Statista, https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ (last visited January 18, 2023) Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population), StatCan, January 24, 2022.

Available: https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ : Diabetes death rate Canada 2000-2020 | Statista

How common is type 2 diabetes in Canada?

Prevalence – 2022 Diabetes (type 1 + type 2 diagnosed + type 2 undiagnosed) Diabetes (type 1 + type 2 diagnosed + type 2 undiagnosed) and prediabetes combined
ON 2,346,000 / 15% 4,713,000 / 30%
NL 102,000 / 19% 190,000 / 35%
PE 25,000 / 15% 50,000 / 31%
NS 173,000 / 17% 335,000 / 33%

How much does Canada spend on diabetes?

Between 2011/12 and 2021/22, new cases of diabetes are estimated to result in $15.36 billion in Canadian health care costs, almost two-thirds of which will be spent on acute hospitalizations and physi- cian services (65.1%).

How common is death from diabetes?

WHO / Panos / Atul Loke People getting their fasting sugar checked for diabetes at government initiated Kamala Raman Nagar dispensary. © Credits Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys and nerves.

The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn’t make enough insulin. In the past 3 decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself.

For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. About 422 million people worldwide have diabetes, the majority living in low-and middle-income countries, and 1.5 million deaths are directly attributed to diabetes each year.

  1. Both the number of cases and the prevalence of diabetes have been steadily increasing over the past few decades.
  2. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include the need to urinate often, thirst, constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes and fatigue.
  3. These symptoms may occur suddenly.
  4. Symptoms for type 2 diabetes are generally similar to those of type 1 diabetes but are often less marked.

As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, after complications have already arisen. For this reason, it is important to be aware of risk factors. Type 1 diabetes cannot currently be prevented. Effective approaches are available to prevent type 2 diabetes and to prevent the complications and premature death that can result from all types of diabetes.

These include policies and practices across whole populations and within specific settings (school, home, workplace) that contribute to good health for everyone, regardless of whether they have diabetes, such as exercising regularly, eating healthily, avoiding smoking, and controlling blood pressure and lipids.

The starting point for living well with diabetes is an early diagnosis – the longer a person lives with undiagnosed and untreated diabetes, the worse their health outcomes are likely to be. Easy access to basic diagnostics, such as blood glucose testing, should therefore be available in primary health care settings.

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Is diabetes free in Canada?

How does diabetes affect Canadians financially? – Hanson: We know that the vast majority of Canadians with diabetes struggle with what are considered ‘catastrophic costs’—spending more than three per cent of their income to treat their diabetes. A lot of medications and supplies people require are not covered unless the individual has an extended medical plan.

Where is diabetes least common in the world?

– According to the IDF Global Diabetes Atlas, the African region currently has the lowest prevalence of diabetes at 4.5%, Experts believe that low levels of diabetes in Africa may partially be due to the low levels of urbanization and prevalence of obesity.

Is sugar a problem in Canada?

Two out of three Canadians eat too much sugar – Canada’s Food Guide advises modest use of sugar and the World Health Organization recommends that less than 10 per cent of our daily energy intake should come from “free sugar”, which is the sugar added to many processed foods as well as the naturally occurring sugar found in fruit juices, honey and syrup.

For additional health benefits, less than five per cent is recommended. Using data reported in the 2015 Canadian Community Health Survey on nutrition, the researchers found that two out of three Canadians eat more sugar than recommended. They then established risk estimates for 16 diet-related chronic conditions, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, kidney disease and low back pain.

They calculated avoidable direct health-care costs such as doctors, hospitals and drugs, along with indirect costs like productivity losses due to illness and disability. They concluded that if Canadians had followed the 10 per cent recommendation in 2019, an estimated $2.5 billion could have been saved, and $5 billion in costs could have been avoided by following the stricter five per cent recommendation.

  • Treatment and management of chronic diseases accounts for 67 per cent of all health-care costs in Canada, they reported, with an annual price tag of up to $190 billion.
  • They estimated that limiting free sugar consumption to less than 10 per cent of energy intake could reduce the prevalence of diabetes by 27 per cent, and that benefit could reach 44.8 per cent if Canadians limited their sugar consumption to less than five per cent.

“Diabetes is just a very expensive condition to manage and to treat. It can occur at an early age, and you can live with it for a long, long time. Kidney issues, dialysis, amputation, those are just a few gruesome examples of where that disease trajectory can go,” said Veugelers.

How high is too high for blood sugar in Canada?

What is a typical blood sugar level? – In Canada, blood sugar levels are measured in mmol/L (millimoles per litre). A person who doesn’t have diabetes usually has a blood sugar level somewhere between 3.5 mmol/L and 7.8 mmol/L, depending on when they last ate.

6 to 10 mmol/L for children younger than 6 years 4 to 10 mmol/L for children 6 to 12 years old 4 to 7 mmol/L for teenagers

What percentage of Canada has type 2 diabetes?

Results and discussion – Rates of diabetes are shown in Table 1, In 2016/17, approximately 8.8% of Canadians (9.4% male, 8.1% female, aged ≥ 1 year) were living with diabetes. Diabetes prevalence was higher in adults than in children and youth (10.9% vs.0.3%). This means that in 2016/17, approximately 3.2 million Canadians were living with diabetes ( Figure 1-A ); or approximately 1 in 11 adults (aged ≥ 20 years) and 1 in 333 children and youth (aged 1–19 years). Since 2000/01, age-standardized prevalence rates have increased by an average of 3.3% per year ( p <,001; Figure 1-A ). The greatest increase averaged 5.3% between 2000/01 and 2006/07 ( p <,001). From 2006/07 to 2010/11, the age-standardized prevalence rate increased an average of 3.3% per year ( p <,001); from 2010/11 to 2016/17, the age-standardized prevalence rate increased an average of 1.2% per year ( p <,001).

Is diabetes a leading cause of death in Canada?

Diabetes death rate Canada 2000-2020 Basic Account Get to know the platform Starter Account The ideal entry-level account for individual users $59 USD $39 USD / Month * in the first 12 months Professional Account Full access * Prices do not include sales tax.

  1. Overview Provinces Disease deaths Cancer deaths Other causes Focus: Opioid deaths Further related statistics Learn more about how Statista can support your business. StatCan.
  2. January 24, 2022).
  3. Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population),
  4. In Statista,
  5. Retrieved January 18, 2023, from https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan.

“Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population).” Chart. January 24, 2022. Statista. Accessed January 18, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan. (2022). Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population),

  1. Statista,
  2. Statista Inc.
  3. Accessed: January 18, 2023.
  4. Https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan.
  5. Death Rate for Diabetes Mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 Population).” Statista, Statista Inc., 24 Jan 2022, https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ StatCan, Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population) Statista, https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ (last visited January 18, 2023) Death rate for diabetes mellitus in Canada from 2000 to 2020 (per 100,000 population), StatCan, January 24, 2022.

Available: https://www.statista.com/statistics/434418/death-rate-for-diabetes-mellitus-in-canada/ : Diabetes death rate Canada 2000-2020

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