Diabetes Prevalence Who?

Diabetes Prevalence Who
WHO / Panos / Atul Loke People getting their fasting sugar checked for diabetes at government initiated Kamala Raman Nagar dispensary. © Credits Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys and nerves.

The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn’t make enough insulin. In the past 3 decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself.

For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. About 422 million people worldwide have diabetes, the majority living in low-and middle-income countries, and 1.5 million deaths are directly attributed to diabetes each year.

Both the number of cases and the prevalence of diabetes have been steadily increasing over the past few decades. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include the need to urinate often, thirst, constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes and fatigue. These symptoms may occur suddenly. Symptoms for type 2 diabetes are generally similar to those of type 1 diabetes but are often less marked.

As a result, the disease may be diagnosed several years after onset, after complications have already arisen. For this reason, it is important to be aware of risk factors. Type 1 diabetes cannot currently be prevented. Effective approaches are available to prevent type 2 diabetes and to prevent the complications and premature death that can result from all types of diabetes.

These include policies and practices across whole populations and within specific settings (school, home, workplace) that contribute to good health for everyone, regardless of whether they have diabetes, such as exercising regularly, eating healthily, avoiding smoking, and controlling blood pressure and lipids.

The starting point for living well with diabetes is an early diagnosis – the longer a person lives with undiagnosed and untreated diabetes, the worse their health outcomes are likely to be. Easy access to basic diagnostics, such as blood glucose testing, should therefore be available in primary health care settings.

What is the prevalence of diabetes in the world?

South and Central America – 1 in 11 (32 million) adults are living with diabetes. The number of adults with diabetes is expected to reach 40 million by 2030 and 49 million by 2045. 1 in 3 adults living with diabetes are undiagnosed. 410,000 deaths caused by diabetes in 2021. USD 65 billion spent on diabetes in 2021. 1 in 11 adults (90 million) are living with diabetes. The number of adults with diabetes is expected to reach 113 million by 2030 and 151 million by 2045. Over 1 in 2 adults living with diabetes are undiagnosed. 747,000 deaths caused by diabetes in 2021. USD 10 billion spent on diabetes in 2021. 1 in 8 adults (206 million) are living with diabetes. The number of adults with diabetes is expected to reach 238 million by 2030 and 260 million by 2045. Over 1 in 2 adults living with diabetes are undiagnosed. 2.3 million deaths caused by diabetes in 2021. USD 241 billion spent on diabetes in 2021.537 million adults are living with diabetes 3 in 4 adults with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries 6.7 million deaths due to diabetes in 2021 24 million Adults living with diabetes 1 in 2 people with diabetes are undiagnosed 416 thousand deaths due to diabetes in 2021 61 million adults living with diabetes.1 in 3 adults with diabetes are undiagnosed.1.1 million deaths caused by diabetes in 2021.73 million adults living with diabetes 1 in 3 adults with diabetes are undiagnosed.796 thousand deaths due to diabetes in 2021 51 million adults living with diabetes 1 in 4 adults with diabetes are undiagnosed 415 billion USD spent on diabetes in 2021 32 million adults living with diabetes 1 in 3 adults living with diabetes are undiagnosed 410 thousand deaths caused by diabetes in 2021 90 million adults living with diabetes.1 in 2 adults with diabetes are undiagnosed.747 thousand deaths caused by diabetes in 2021.206 million adults living with diabetes.1 in 2 adults with diabetes are undiagnosed.2.3 million deaths caused by diabetes in 2021.

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What is the incidence and prevalence of diabetes?

Overall numbers –

Prevalence: In 2019, 37.3 million Americans, or 11.3% of the population, had diabetes.

Nearly 1.9 million Americans have type 1 diabetes, including about 244,000 children and adolescents

Diagnosed and undiagnosed: Of the 37.3 million adults with diabetes, 28.7 million were diagnosed, and 8.5 million were undiagnosed. Prevalence in seniors: The percentage of Americans age 65 and older remains high, at 29.2%, or 15.9 million seniors (diagnosed and undiagnosed). New cases: 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Prediabetes: In 2019, 96 million Americans age 18 and older had prediabetes.

Who has the highest prevalence of diabetes?

China is the country with the highest number of diabetics worldwide, with around 141 million people suffering from the disease. By the year 2045, it is predicted that China will have around 174 million people with diabetes.

What is the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus?

Other national databases, such as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes Surveillance System, reported in 2022 a prevalence of diagnosed diabetes of approximately 11.3 percent of adults (37.3 million people, with 28.7 million with diagnosed diabetes, an estimated 8.5 million undiagnosed, and 95 percent

Is prevalence of diabetes increasing?

Abstract – To forecast future trends in diabetes prevalence, morbidity, and costs in the United States, the Institute for Alternative Futures has updated its diabetes forecasting model and extended its projections to 2030 for the nation, all states, and several metropolitan areas.

  • This paper describes the methodology and data sources for these diabetes forecasts and discusses key implications.
  • In short, diabetes will remain a major health crisis in America, in spite of medical advances and prevention efforts.
  • The prevalence of diabetes (type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes) will increase by 54% to more than 54.9 million Americans between 2015 and 2030; annual deaths attributed to diabetes will climb by 38% to 385,800; and total annual medical and societal costs related to diabetes will increase 53% to more than $622 billion by 2030.

Improvements in management reducing the annual incidence of morbidities and premature deaths related to diabetes over this time period will result in diabetes patients living longer, but requiring many years of comprehensive management of multiple chronic diseases, resulting in dramatically increased costs.

Why is the prevalence of diabetes increasing?

Diabetes Incidence and Prevalence – Diabetes was the eighth leading cause of death in the United States in 2020.12 Adults 50 or older with diabetes die 4.6 years earlier, develop disability 6 to 7 years earlier, and spend about 1 to 2 more years in a disabled state than adults without diabetes.13 About 37.3 million people—or 11.3% of the US population—had diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed) in 2019.

  • This total included 37.1 million adults 18 or older, or 14.7% of all US adults.
  • About 8.5 million of these adults had diabetes but were not aware that they had it or did not report that they had it.10 After almost 2 decades of continual increases, the incidence of diagnosed cases of diabetes (type 1 and type 2 combined) among adults in the United States decreased during 2009–2019.10 Diabetes incidence is the rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes.

About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes (5.9 per 1,000 people) were diagnosed among US adults 18 or older in 2019. Figure 1 shows diabetes incidence trends during 2001–2019, with a generally declining curve after 2009. The decrease in diabetes incidence may be due to multiple factors that cannot be determined by current data. Notes: Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Census standard population. Figure adapted from CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report, Data source: National Health Interview Survey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes prevalence is the total number of existing cases, including new cases.

  1. The prevalence of total and diagnosed diabetes among US adults 18 or older steadily increased from the time period of 2001–2004 to 2017–2020 (Figure 2).
  2. Similar trends were seen across all categories examined: age, sex, racial and ethnic group, education level.10 The increase in diabetes prevalence may be due in part to people living longer with diabetes because of improvements in self-management practices, lifestyle change interventions, and health care services.
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Figure 2. Trends in Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes, Undiagnosed Diabetes, and Total Diabetes Among Adults Aged 18 Years or Older, United States, 2001–2004 to 2017–2020 Notes: Percentages are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Census standard population. Diagnosed diabetes was based on self-report. Undiagnosed diabetes was based on fasting plasma glucose and A1C levels among people self-reporting no diabetes. Figure adapted from CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report,

Why is diabetes more prevalent in low income countries?

Diabetes The number of people with diabetes has nearly quadrupled since 1980. Prevalence is increasing worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The causes are complex, but the rise is due in part to increases in the number of people who are overweight, including an increase in obesity, and in a widespread lack of physical activity.

Diabetes of all types can lead to complications in many parts of the body and increase the risk of dying prematurely. In 2012 diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths globally. A large proportion of diabetes and its complications can be prevented by a healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use.

In April 2016, WHO published the Global report on diabetes, which calls for action to reduce exposure to the known risk factors for type 2 diabetes and to improve access to and quality of care for people with all forms of diabetes. : Diabetes

Which country is diabetes capital of the world?

India is deemed as the world’s capital of diabetes.

What percentage of human population has diabetes?

Diabetes Facts and Statistics – Diabetes occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. High blood glucose can cause health problems over time. The main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational. Learn more from the Diabetes Overview,

Total: An estimated 34.2 million people have diabetes (10.5 percent of the U.S. population). Diagnosed: An estimated 26.9 million people of all ages have been diagnosed with diabetes (8.2 percent of the U.S. population).

Of the people diagnosed with diabetes, 210,000 are children and adolescents younger than age 20 years, including 187,000 with type 1 diabetes.

Undiagnosed: An estimated 7.3 million adults ages 18 years or older have diabetes but are undiagnosed (21.4 percent of adults with diabetes).

View the full report: National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2020 (PDF, 768 KB) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to the American Diabetes Association’s Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S., the total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2017 was $327 billion, including $237 billion in direct medical costs and $90 billion in reduced productivity.

What percentage of the population will get diabetes?

Global diabetes statistics – In 2021, the 10th edition of the International Diabetes Federation’s (IDF) Diabetes Atlas estimated that:

One in 10 adults has diabetes (537 million) One in two adults with diabetes is undiagnosed 11.5 per cent of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes (USD$966 billion) One in seven births is affected by gestational diabetes Three-quarters (75 per cent) of people with diabetes live in low- and middle-income countries 648,000 children have type 1 diabetes Every five seconds a person dies from diabetes (6.7 million deaths)

By 2030, IDF estimates that:

One adult in nine will have diabetes (643 million) Diabetes-related health expenditure will exceed USD$1,028 billion

By 2045, IDF estimates that:

One adult in eight will have diabetes (783 million) Diabetes-related health expenditure will exceed USD$1,054 billion

29 per cent of all adults with diabetes live in the Western Pacific region (which includes Australia):

China with over 140 million people with diabetes (ranked highest number of people with diabetes) Indonesia with 19.5 million people with diabetes (5th highest) Japan with 11 million people with diabetes (9th highest)

*Sourced by the International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas Key Findings 2021

Why is the prevalence of diabetes increasing?

Diabetes Incidence and Prevalence – Diabetes was the eighth leading cause of death in the United States in 2020.12 Adults 50 or older with diabetes die 4.6 years earlier, develop disability 6 to 7 years earlier, and spend about 1 to 2 more years in a disabled state than adults without diabetes.13 About 37.3 million people—or 11.3% of the US population—had diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed) in 2019.

  1. This total included 37.1 million adults 18 or older, or 14.7% of all US adults.
  2. About 8.5 million of these adults had diabetes but were not aware that they had it or did not report that they had it.10 After almost 2 decades of continual increases, the incidence of diagnosed cases of diabetes (type 1 and type 2 combined) among adults in the United States decreased during 2009–2019.10 Diabetes incidence is the rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes.
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About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes (5.9 per 1,000 people) were diagnosed among US adults 18 or older in 2019. Figure 1 shows diabetes incidence trends during 2001–2019, with a generally declining curve after 2009. The decrease in diabetes incidence may be due to multiple factors that cannot be determined by current data. Notes: Rates are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Census standard population. Figure adapted from CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report, Data source: National Health Interview Survey, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes prevalence is the total number of existing cases, including new cases.

The prevalence of total and diagnosed diabetes among US adults 18 or older steadily increased from the time period of 2001–2004 to 2017–2020 (Figure 2). Similar trends were seen across all categories examined: age, sex, racial and ethnic group, education level.10 The increase in diabetes prevalence may be due in part to people living longer with diabetes because of improvements in self-management practices, lifestyle change interventions, and health care services.

Figure 2. Trends in Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes, Undiagnosed Diabetes, and Total Diabetes Among Adults Aged 18 Years or Older, United States, 2001–2004 to 2017–2020 Notes: Percentages are age-adjusted to the 2000 US Census standard population. Diagnosed diabetes was based on self-report. Undiagnosed diabetes was based on fasting plasma glucose and A1C levels among people self-reporting no diabetes. Figure adapted from CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report,

Why is diabetes so prevalent today?

Background – With 382 million people living with diabetes in 2013, the World Health Organization declared the condition as being epidemic, It is estimated that diabetes will affect 3.7 million Canadians in 2018, making it the principal health challenge of the country,

Diabetes is associated with many health complications. Comparing the population with and without diabetes, those with diabetes have a 300% increased risk of being hospitalized, Annual per capita healthcare costs for people with diabetes are three to four times greater than for individuals without diabetes,

New Brunswick is one of the provinces in Canada where the prevalence of diabetes is the highest, The prevalence of diabetes is estimated to have increased by 86% in this province between 2000 and 2010, A population-level increase in prevalence of diabetes may be attributable to a wide range of potential factors,

Obesity is often seen as the main contributor to an increasing prevalence of diabetes but other factors such as ageing, ethnicity, lifestyle (i.e., physical inactivity and energy dense diet), socioeconomic status, education, and urbanization have also been identified as potentially important factors,

Further findings also suggest that increasing incidence rates of diabetes and global changes are other potential explanatory factors (e.g. environmental pollution, obesogenic environment and rapid socioeconomic development) that could affect the entire population,

In addition to changes in the prevalence of risk factors, other elements, including increases in screening, changes in diagnostic criteria, and decreasing mortality rates among individuals with diabetes could contribute to the rise in prevalence of this condition. Perhaps due to the wide variety of factors potentially responsible for an increase in prevalence of diabetes, no studies have attempted to present a comprehensive list of factors which could be responsible for population-level changes in prevalence of diabetes.

A comprehensive list of factors that contribute to the growing prevalence of diabetes would provide a foundation for population health planning in developing successful strategies to address this epidemic of diabetes. As such, the objectives of this study were (1) to develop a comprehensive list of factors to consider when trying to identify causes of change in prevalence of diabetes in a population and (2) to use this list to describe factors that may be responsible for the recent increase in prevalence of type 2 diabetes in New Brunswick.

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